How series are impacting luxury ads

Some say brand content is doomed to disappear, others say it just needs to be reinvented. I think it is still very alive and adopting the codes of popular contents among millenials. The latest example that caught my attention is Kate Spade New York’s latest campaign called #Missadventure season 2, which was launched on March 28th.

The East Coast preppy fashion brand is making a statement with a series of videos targeted to young women, featuring millenials’ insights (relying on apps for everything, anyone?), social media codes, and a focus on TV-like entertainment – notably with the participation TV shows actresses (Girl‘s Zosia Mamet and 2 Broke Girls‘s Kat Dennings).

As a series enthusiast, I can only appreciate the initiative from the brand. While the first season of the #Missadventure campaign, staring actress Anna Kendrick, was clearly a way to showcase Kate Spade products in funny and relatable situations for young women (with the possibility to click on items during the video and see all related information after the video credentials), this second season is starting off with a more constructed scenario, if I dare say so. The first episode is slightly longer than in the previous season (4 minutes for this one, compared to 2:30 to 3:45 minutes for the previous ones), and the brand copied some codes from TV shows with a teaser and videos focusing on each of the main characters. Contents were shared on the brand’s social media channels with catchy posts inspired by TV shows teasing campaigns (see example below).

Not only are the videos and teasing campaign greatly executed, they also leverage relatable insights for millenial women while sharing the luxurious, preppy and feminine identity of the Kate Spade brand. I definitely will watch the next videos, not only to satisfy my marketer’s curiosity, but also to find out the rest of the characters’ adventures. I guess Kate Spade’s campaign worked on me!

Why apps are the future of luxury

You’ve heard it a thousand times: “apps are the future!”, “go mobile or go home”, “mobile first”. It’s true, and yet, a lot of brands are still ignoring it. Mobile usage is extending (both in time and in ways of usage), and luxury brands (among others) have started looking at mobile marketing as a new touchpoint with their customers.

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Mobile apps vs web apps

A mobile version of a website is not an app. It doesn’t serve the same purpose on the brand’s side (at least, it shouldn’t) and it doesn’t answer the same needs on the customer’s side.

Web apps” are accessible through a navigator. The customer types keywords on Google, let’s say, finds your web app, and checks it. It’s a punctual need (details about a product, quick online purchase, etc.). While they’re easy to access (no need to download the app), they don’t create any sense of loyalty and usually don’t attract returning visitors.

On the other hand, “mobile apps” are specifically designed to be an app, and usually have a different purpose than the website. They can serve m-commerce purposes but usually go beyond that. They tend to create loyalty thanks to new contents, and they enable brands to use push notifications. Also, the small icon on the phone’s homepage is a good reminder to return to the app.

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Mobile apps have their own purpose

Apps are not websites, so they shouldn’t merely be a mobile-optimized copy of those. Let’s look at some successful examples.

Hermès launched its Silk Knots app, as I mentioned in a previous article, to teach customers about different ways to knot scarves. Customers draw extra value out of the app: they learn something that is not limited to the brand since they can use the knotting techniques on any square scarf. The app simply improves the way they feel about the brand.

Dior launched the app Dior Mag. Dior Mag is actually something that exists on the brand’s website. The app delivers stories about the brand, interviews, news about the shows, etc. Dior invites customers to discover the story of the brand and to get to know the brand better. This is key to a stronger connection with the brand and to returning visitors.

Finally, Louis Vuitton tried to solve this awkward moment when a customer flips through a magazine, looks at the latest Louis Vuitton ad and wonders which bag is shown, what it’s made of, etc. On some ads, an icon reads “LV Pass” and the LV Pass app enables customers to scan the ad to get information about the products, making-ofs of the ad, etc. This app is an example of how a brand can extend the customer experience at home, starting with an ad that would be in magazines anyway.

Takeaways: what an app should do

  • Have a purpose of its own: it should have its own message
  • Be user-friendly
  • Embrace the brand’s DNA: an app should be an extension of the brand and its values
  • Link to other channels (website, social media, messaging apps, etc.)
  • Reinvent the brand: an app is an opportunity to post new contents regularly, explore new possibilities of experience, make the brand memorable. Luxury is associated with exclusivity and quality; customers can be provided with a little bit of luxury anywhere and anytime they want thanks to apps. Whether what it offers is unique, useful, fun, etc., differentiation will make a brand stand out.

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Cheers, and enjoy the weekend,

Constance

Burberry partners with Line to live stream shows in Japan

Burberry and Apple partnership during a fashion show in 2013 (source: Google)

Burberry was the first luxury brand to live stream its fashion shows for online visitors a few years ago. Later, it partnered with Apple to capture a show with the latest iPhone’s camera. This year, Burberry is launching a new partnership. Only this time it is with Japanese messaging app Line.

By leveraging the app’s channel feature, Burberry is aiming at reaching Japanese connected consumers with video content. Live streams of fashion shows, to be more precise. The first show should be the women’s fashion show taking place at the end of the month.

Through this channel, Burberry hopes to connect more strongly with its Japanese consumers while reaching them on their smartphones. You may already have heard of news channel CNN’s presence on Line to deliver short video contents to consumers on their mobiles. Here,  Burberry is taking this approach to the fashion universe and innovating with a close relationship to consumers.

With over 181 million active users in Japan, Line is an extra channel for the already digitally active fashion brand to create a differentiated consumer experience. The brand is also said to be designing stickers of Line characters wearing Burberry clothes, thereby further developing a differentiation. However, this service will, as of now, only be for Japanese users so we can only follow these news closely to see how things roll out for Burberry! And I imagine other brands will quickly follow.