How Snapchat can boost e-commerce sales

Michael Kors has come up with a fun, smart use of Snapchat that may just solve one of the key issues brands are facing with online shopping.

While purchasing a bag online doesn’t necessarily require a fitting room session before hand, shopping for clothes or accessories you actually wear on our body usually does (let’s say sunglasses). To advertise for its Kendall II shades, the brand Michael Kors set up a Snapchat lens¬†on June 27th, which just happens to be the U.S. National Sunglasses Day (apparently, there is such a thing).

Just like any other Snapchat lens, this one allows users to take a selfie and the lens filter sets the sunglasses on their nose! So Snapchat users in the U.S. were able to have fun virtually trying on luxury sunglasses on for 24h and sending the results to their friends. This campaign leveraged the whole hype around the National Sunglasses Day and mixed it with the overall enthusiasm for selfies among millennials, which in result created branded moments in young people’s exchanges with their friends.

The Kendall II sunglasses being relatively affordable for a luxury brand (they’re priced 149$), targeting millennials through one of their favorite apps was a great way to secure some top-of-mind brand and product awareness for the model as the summer holidays are approaching.

I believe fashion brands should create similar campaigns to generate engagement around their products in a fun way, that focuses on the users and their friends, rather than focusing on celebrities and products. While it may be hard to develop a lens filter, it is worth it in terms of awareness and feelings towards the brand.

Your guide to doing the Festival de Cannes right

The Festival de Cannes 2016 ended a few days ago and, just like every year, celebrities proudly posed in their designers’ outfits¬†on the red carpet. Brands, just as they do every year, happily shared photos of celebrities wearing their latest designs across their social media channels.

Some brands, however, decided to shake things up. Surprisingly, the two brands I have in mind went for a similar message: a guide to experiencing the Festival de Cannes the best way.

Dolce&Gabbana’s guide to making the most of the Cannes Film Festival

Dolce & Gabbana took advantage of the famous movie festival to launch a social media campaign centered on the event. The brand share pictures (of models only) at Cannes, doing things celebs do at Cannes, and wearing the brand’s designs. The¬†twist of the campaign was in the posts’ descriptions.

Dolce & Gabbana clearly positioned its campaign as a “guide to making the most of the Cannes Film Festival” and shared 16 rules. Rules ranged from “dress to impress“, to “surround yourself with stylish friends“, “never blend in with the crowds” or “take an ice-cream break“. This touch of humor,¬†paired with the too-perfect-to-be-true scenes pictured, made for an entertaining campaign that spread over 4 days on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Too bad¬†it didn’t the brand long to go back to¬†sharing photos of celebs wearing its creations again, slightly ruining the efforts of the campaign to position the brand as a self-deprecating one.

#whathappensinCannes (stays in Cannes!) with Elie Saab

Elie Saab, on the other hand, mixed celebrities photocalls with fun and self-deprecating content, ranging from gifs of a suitcase being filled, to pictures featuring a key piece form the brand’s collection and a second degree caption.

For example, the brand shared a gif of woman scrolling through her Instagram feed, with the caption “Half way through, time for a recap”.

Mixing fun, on-point insights of young women with high fashion content, the brand successfully twisted the traditional Cannes communication. All contents of the campaign are gathered on the brand’s site.

Half way through, time for a recap. See #WhatHappensInCannes on #TheLightOfNow | Link in Bio #Cannes2016

A post shared by ELIE SAAB (@eliesaabworld) on

 

These two initiatives brought a refreshing touch to the way brands approach major red carpet events, and it follows the trend of campaigns focusing on humor and millenials’ insights that we have seen among luxury brands in the past few months. It seems luxury brands are finding their voice one after the other, and they seem to have chosen a¬†young, friendly and social media savvy¬†voice.

Find your eyewear match with FENDI and Spotify

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Screenshot of Fendi Eyeshine pages

Music tastes are usually seen as a reflection of someone’s personality and mood, and this is exactly how¬†FENDI intends on finding the perfect Eyeshine sunglasses for you.

Use your eyes and ears to find your next sunglasses

The brand recently launched a multisensory experience to showcase its Eyeshine product¬†line, using a selection of 4 of Quebec singer Coeur de Pirate’s tracks to identify visitors’ mood. Each song title echoes to a specific style of Eyeshine glasses: Golden Baby for the golden style, Woods Darker than Night¬†for the dark model,¬†Ocean Brawls for the aqua shades and¬†Drapeau Blanc for the white frames.

After choosing among these tracks, visitors are driven through a list of songs that further explore their current mood: from classics such as The Beatles, Nirvana and Pink Floyd to more recent artists such as Katy Perry and Lorde, FENDI used Spotify to create playlists in line with each of the four moods and personality traits they matched with the four current Eyeshine colors.

Make your mood, style and playlist a match

After browsing through the music selection, visitors discover a quick presentation of the Eyeshine style, a description of who they are right for (e.g., “Fendi Eyeshine White is the perfect match for a chic, sophisticated person”) and they are invited to discover and follow a Spotify playlist dedicated to their eyewear match.

FENDI went one step further than most brand’s “tell me what you do, I’ll tell you what to wear” quizzes and designed a fun and ear-pleasing experience, which is quite an original¬†way to sell sunglasses!

How series are impacting luxury ads

Some say brand content is doomed to disappear, others say it just needs to be reinvented. I think¬†it is still very alive and adopting the codes of popular contents¬†among millenials.¬†The latest example that caught my attention is Kate Spade New York’s latest campaign called¬†#Missadventure season 2, which was launched on March 28th.

The East Coast preppy fashion brand is making a statement with a series of videos targeted to young women, featuring millenials’¬†insights (relying on apps for everything, anyone?), social media codes, and a focus on TV-like entertainment – notably¬†with the participation TV shows actresses (Girl‘s¬†Zosia Mamet and¬†2 Broke Girls‘s Kat Dennings).

As a series enthusiast, I can only appreciate the initiative from the brand. While the first season of the #Missadventure campaign, staring actress Anna Kendrick,¬†was clearly a way to showcase¬†Kate Spade products in funny and relatable situations for young women (with the possibility to click on items during the video and see all related information after the video credentials), this second season is starting off with a more constructed scenario, if I dare say so. The first episode is slightly longer than in the previous season (4 minutes for this one, compared to 2:30 to 3:45 minutes for the previous ones), and the brand copied some codes from TV shows with a¬†teaser and¬†videos focusing on each of the main characters. Contents were shared on the brand’s social media channels with catchy¬†posts inspired by TV shows teasing campaigns (see example below).

Not only are¬†the videos and teasing campaign greatly executed, they also leverage¬†relatable insights for millenial women while sharing the luxurious, preppy and feminine identity of the Kate Spade brand. I definitely will watch the next videos, not only to satisfy my marketer’s curiosity, but also to find out the rest of the characters’ adventures. I guess Kate Spade’s campaign worked on me!